Facial Treatments and Seven Tips for Dry Skin

February 15, 2010 by admin · Leave a Comment 

AVOCADO FACE SCRUB

Herbalist Greta Breedlove came up with this natural homemade skin care recipes face utilizing the seed of the avocado. It makes a moisturizing face scrub, especially for dry skin. Let an avocado dry a few days until you can remove the skin easily. Chop, then pulverize in a blender or food mill. Moisten with a little milk and smooth over your face, throat.

AVOCADO FACIAL CLEANSER

One egg yolk, beaten until light and frothy
1/2 cup milk
1/2 avacado, peeled and mashed

Beat the mixture with a fork until you have a thin cream or lotion consistency. Apply with cotton balls as you would a cleanser.

A contributing factor to dry, flaky, skin in winter is a drop in temperature. Although winter sometimes feels damp, there is usually less water in the air than on your skin and that creates a moisture vapour loss from the skin. As skin becomes drier, its surface layer stops producing the natural lipids which prevent moisture loss, and water cannot be retained so easily. Dry skin will also show wrinkles more easlit and contribute to an aging appearance.

As a result of all these factors, sometimes skin on the face and body tends to be in worse condition in the winter months than at other times of the year. In extreme cases, a constant drying effect can even lead to cracking, flaking and redness.

These four tips for helping to keep dry skin at bay during the colder months come from Dr. Kucy Pon, Olay dermatologist.

1. A moisturizer is essential - A moisturizer performs several important functions, including replacing lost water. Water-binding ingredients, such as glycerin, help keep it in the skin.

2. Create an oasis - Put some moisture back into the air by using a humidifier in your home or office. It will counteract the drying effects of indoor heat.

3. Drink lots of water - Increase your body’s natural moisture level by staying hydrated throughout the day.

4. Keep wrapped up - Dress for the season and try to limit your skin’s exposure to harsh temperatures and damaging winds.

If you have dry skin, then you probably already know it can be really difficult to care for. When you don’t look after it properly, it can become flaky, and if it gets really bad, may even become irritated and red. Although it’s possible to find plenty of products that claim to be able to solve dry skin problems, unfortunately most of their claims are sales hype.

Although most over the counter products don’t do much to combat dry skin, there are a number of things you can do to improve the condition of your skin. It’s mostly a question of making some basic changes to your daily skincare routine. It won’t take long for your skin to appear more healthy and vibrant.

With dry skin, you have completely the opposite problem to someone with oily skin. Basically, your skin is suffering from a lack of sebum, the oil that helps to keep the skin moist and supple. People with oily skin produce far too much sebum. Sebum is actually made from skin cells, and is an essential ingredient in healthy, supple skin. Because dry skin has insufficient oil, you need to replace it from both inside and outside.

5.  Moisturize

One of the best things you can do for your skin is to use a good quality moisturizer. Choose a cream that is rich, but not heavy. Consider choosing a natural cream with aloe vera and chamomile. Both these ingredients are very soothing, as well as helping to reduce dryness and improve the skin’s healing abilities.

6. Choose Healthy Foods

You also need to look at the type of foods you eat. It’s important to choose healthy foods, because the healthier your body, the healthier your skin will be. You may not realize this, but your skin is actually the largest organ of your body. So it needs to be nourished just like all the other organs in your body.

7.  Supplement

Depending on the types of food you already eat, you might need to consider taking a supplement, such as Vitamin E, Omega-3 oils and B-Complex vitamins. Making sure you get enough of these important nutrients is a great way to improve the condition of your skin.

By nourishing your skin in all these ways, you should soon a marked reduction in the level of dryness. Helping your skin to be more supple and moist also helps to slow down the process of aging, so you’re the winner in two ways.

By Tom Turner

End of Summer Skincare and Sun Protection

September 9, 2009 by admin · Leave a Comment 

By Van Le | Labor Day can be bittersweet since it offers an always-welcomed three-day weekend, but it also marks the unofficial end of summer. In other words, after one last frolic at the beach, it’s time to put away the swimming suits and flip-flops, and wake the winter coats and boots from their hiatus. The seasonal closet makeover is a no-brainer, but there’s another place that needs attention: your makeup and skincare cabinet. Towards the end of the year, your skin needs protection from cold weather and reduced humidity. Switching to winter-friendly products can keep your skin looking healthy and beautiful.

Hot, humid weather during the summer can cause pores to expand because sebum is more fluid in this environment. As a result, deep cleansers and foamy cleansing products are appropriate, since they are able to reach deep into the pores, eliminating dirt and oil buildups. During the winter, however, cold temperatures can lead to dry and cracked skin. Switch to a mild soap, and your skin will feel smooth and soft as opposed to dry and tight after washing. Products that contain natural moisture such as Aloe vera are also excellent, since they are not harsh on dry, winter skin.

Winter air literally sucks moisture from your skin, so moisturizing is a crucial step in winter skin care. Even more important to moisturizing is choosing the right product. Products containing mineral oil, almond oil, or avocado oil work especially well since they keep the skin hydrated without clogging pores. Flaxseed oil is another beneficial ingredient, since it is not only rich in omega-3 fatty acid, but also has the ability to hydrate the skin from the inside out. Moisturizing right after a warm shower will help seal in the water and prevent dry skin. Also consider using a humidifier in your room or office, since it returns the moisture into the air and help the skin stay hydrated.

Just because it is cold outside does not mean you should toss your sunscreen tube. Even when you can’t feel the heat, the sun is still emitting harmful UVA and UVB rays, so it still important to protect your skin. Apply a moisturizer that contains an SPF of at least 15, or use products containing zinc oxide, which acts as a natural barrier between your skin and the sun. Surprisingly, the sun’s reflective power on snow can be as high as 80%, so it is possible to be sunburned after spending a day on the ski slopes without sun protection. Moreover, don’t forget to help your lips battle harsh winter conditions with plenty of lip balm. Packaging is also important when deciding on a lip balm. Little tins and jars can spread germs since you are using your fingers to apply. Tubes can be a healthier and more convenient option. Remember to keep your skincare products readily available in your purse, car or desk so you can reapply throughout the day.

Winter skin care may differ from summer skin care in the type of products used, but the regimen for healthy skin is the same year round: cleanse, moisturize and protect.

Van Le is a staff writer for the CSU paper the Daily Titan and writing intern for Vivoderm Laboratories in Los Angeles, California. She is currently pursuing a Journalism degree at California State University, Fullerton.

For the latest findings on natural skincare link to http://organicskincareinfo.net

Heal Your Skin with Aloe Vera

August 5, 2009 by admin · Leave a Comment 

By: Van Le |  The healing power of Aloe vera has been known for decades, dating back to the Egyptian era when it is believed that Cleopatra used it as a skincare remedy, and found in Greek history when it is believed that Alexander the Great used it to care for his army after battles.  Today, Aloe vera is widely used in many cosmetic products, anti-inflammatory creams, and some grocery store shelves even boast Aloe vera juice.

Aloe vera is a member of the succulent (water-retaining) plant family, and is also known as “lily of the desert” since researchers believe it originated in Africa.  There are over 250 known species of Aloe vera, and are relatively easy to care for, therefore increasing its popularity.  The spokes of Aloe vera plants are filled with a gel-like substance that is filled with a combination of enzymes, vitamins and minerals.  Dermatologists and cosmetic companies often extract the gel for use in their products.   Aloe vera is also considered an alternative treatment for high blood pressure and intestinal problems.

Aloe vera is a popular choice for the treatment of sunburn, since it contains a variety of enzymes and amino acids that are anti-inflammatory and speed up the skin’s healing process.  Many after-sun moisturizing creams contain Aloe, and for those who have access to actual Aloe plants, the gel can be applied directly on the affected area.

Aloe vera is a common ingredient in many cosmetic products, particularly anti-aging and anti-acne products due to its ability to generate healthier skin.  The combination of enzymes, vitamins and minerals in Aloe vera products increases oxygen flow, which toughens the skin tissues and provides protection from pollutants and dirt.  It also moisturizes the skin and increases its elasticity, which reduces wrinkles and signs of aging.  Used in conjunction with exfoliating products, Aloe vera can help control acne by helping shed dead skin cells and reduce redness.

Once Alternative, Now Mainstream

Not so long ago, herbal products or foods deemed “natural” were considered less than desirable by the mainstream public.  The Industrial Revolution not only changed the face of production and how we worked, it changed what we ate and used for our health.  Mass-produced, new chemical compounds in fancy packaging quickly replaced the ‘old-fashioned’ herbal remedies used by our grandmothers.

While Aloe vera never completely fell out of favor, by the 1970’s and 80’s use of medical plants and herbs to treat ailments and skin conditions was considered unconventional and provided mostly by naturalists and alternative therapists. In the new millennium, science and technology have not proven to be the miracle we were expecting.  Today, modern science is re-discovering what our already ancestors knew.  Aloe vera and similar natural treatments provide vital healing, nourishing and regenerative qualities that no chemical lab can re-create.

Van Le is a staff writer for the CSU Daily Titan and writing intern for Vivoderm Laboratories in Los Angeles, California. She is currently pursuing a Journalism degree at California State University, Fullerton.

For the latest findings on natural skincare, you can also link to http://bestfacemask.com

Treating and Preventing Sunburn and Acne Scars

July 30, 2009 by admin · Leave a Comment 

sunglass-250x150-150x150 Treating and Preventing Sunburn and Acne ScarsPlaying in the sun is not fun if you have to deal with sunburn afterward.  On long, hot summer days, we are all tempted to spend the day relaxing
poolside or at the beach, and most of us have suffered the consequences of too much sun exposure.  The desire for the perfect golden tan can sometimes lead to sunburns, which is very harmful for the skin.  If you suffer from acne, a sunburn can further damage your skin and cause permanent scarring.

Sunburn is a delayed inflammatory reaction when the skin is exposed to excessive ultraviolet radiation.  Symptoms of mild sunburn, including redness,
tenderness and pain, often occur a few hours after exposure, and can last for several days.  The pain, itching and peeling is the skin’s reaction to excessive UVA and UVB ray exposure.  Although the skin needs time to heal, there are some remedies and treatments available to help the skin repair itself.

Get out of the sun

It may sound simple enough, but we often do not realize we are sunburned until it is too late. Since it is a delayed reaction, the full extent and severity
of the burn may not appear until up to 12 hours after exposure.   Stop your sun exposure by seeking shade from trees, umbrellas, hats, etc.  Drink lots
of water, since sunburn causes dehydration.  Get some immediate relief for the pain by adding baking soda to a cool bath, and wear loose clothing that
does not stick to the body.

Reduce the pain

Anti-inflammatory medicine such as Advil or Ibuprofen can help relieve the redness and pain associated with sunburn.  Aloe vera is a popular treatment
for sunburn thanks to its ability to moisturize and repair the skin.  Apply a moisturizing cream containing Aloe vera, and if possible, apply the gel from
the actual plant to the affected areas.  Once the burn heals, the skin will begin to peel and may become itchy.  Fight the temptation to pick and
scratch, which can irritate the skin a slow the healing process.  Instead, keep the skin moisturized by applying a moisturizing lotion, which can reduce
itching.

Prevent sunburn

The best way to deal with sunburn is to not get one.   Sunburn may only seem harmless and temporary, but can have lasting effects on the skin and
overall health.  Serious sunburn can cause blisters, shock, lead to cancer and even death if left untreated.  Protect yourself from the sun’s harmful rays
by applying sunscreen at least 30 minutes before going outside.  Wear loose, protective clothing and avoid staying outside for too long during peak
hours (10am to 4pm), when sunrays are harsh.  Choose a sunscreen with SPF of at least 30, and use sun-protection products that contain zinc oxide,
an inorganic ingredient that can deflect UVA rays.  Try Vivoderm’s zinc cream, a natural product that can be used as a nontoxic sunscreen.

By Van Le

Van Le is a staff writer for the CSU Daily Titan and writing intern for Vivoderm Laboratories in Los Angeles, California. She is currently pursuing a Journalism degree at California State University, Fullerton.

For the latest findings on natural skincare, you can also link to http://bestorganicnaturalskincare.com

Treat Sunburn With Herbal Remedies

June 8, 2009 by admin · Leave a Comment 

Herbal remedies are a type of alternative medicine that originates from plants and plant extracts. Used to heal illnesses and disease and to address psychological concerns, herbal remedies have been around for centuries, and were the precursor to modern medicine. Herbal remedies are obtained from a wide variety of natural resources including plant leaves, bark, berries, flowers, and roots. Herbal medicine remains a popular alternative throughout China and the Far East, and is growing in popularity throughout the United States.

Ease the pain and swelling associated with sunburn and accelerate the healing process with herbal remedies, which can be mixed and applied at home. These all natural herbal treatments are safe to use and contain no chemicals.  Read on to learn how to treat sunburn with herbal remedies.

Things You’ll Need:

* Calendula oil
* Aloe vera
* St. John’s Wort oil
* Sea Buckthorn oil
* Black tea bags

Step 1:       Mix 20 drops of calendula oil with four oz. of water and apply to the skin using a washcloth or cotton balls. You can also get calendula in the form of gels and soothing salves. Calendula is antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory; it will help soften the skin and ease the pain.

Step 2:       Soothe burned areas with aloe gel as often as needed. You can either purchase bottled aloe gel or simply break apart the leaves of an aloe plant and apply it directly to the skin. Be careful to remove the spiny edges of the leaf before applying to avoid accidentally poking tender skin.

Step 3:      Apply St. John’s Wort oil, mixed with a couple tablespoons of olive or almond oil, directly to sunburned parts of the skin. St. John’s Wort is anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antibacterial.

Step 4:       Dilute a few drops of Sea Buckthorn oil with olive oil or almond oil and rub into the skin. Repeat two, eight and 24 hours later. Sea Buckthorn oil extract helps to heal sunburns and reduce the damaging effect they have on the skin.

Step 5 :       Place two to three bags of black tea into a bathtub of lukewarm water and soak in it. The tannic acid in tea helps relieve pain. Tea bags can also be wet in hot water, allowed to cool and placed directly onto burned areas. Green or chamomile tea can also be used, and peppermint oil or tea can be added to create a cooling feeling on the skin.

By  eHow Health Editor